How to Tag A Google Analytics Campaign

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tagged google analytics campaign

Ready to get started measuring campaigns driving traffic to your site? For each link you put out—whether from email or social media properties—append your link with a query string using Google’s server syntax to identify up to 4 different content parameters of categorization, all of which can be tracked within Google Analytics.  You can find these reports under Acquisition > Campaigns.

What Does Tagging Enable Me To Do?

Think of tagging your campaigns as putting up turnstiles on paths in a park.  But not only do you get a count of how many people used that path, but you also put a stamp on the hand of everyone who comes through, so you can then see what attractions they visited, how long they spent in the park, and even if they bought ice cream.

Google Analytics can already tell you who your referrers are: whether they came from search, a social media platform, another website, or even directly.  But what about that one special announcement that you made?  Campaign tagging allows you to separate out traffic from specific sources, and see specific behavior that you wouldn’t have been able to observe before.

With this knowledge, you can evaluate landing page performance not in general, but from a specific set of ad copy.  You can track one Facebook link post versus just a picture, and even count conversions from various email campaigns.

So How Do I Tag My Google Analytics Campaign?

Google has a built-in URL builder worksheet that you can use to tag your campaigns, but for any large amount of links to be tagged they even recommend using a spreadsheet to create the same syntax. Well, I have built one already, and I’m willing to share! This past winter, I helped set up my first campaign for a not-for-profit’s conference, with over 120,000 site visits over the course of three months.

For our workflow, we used a collaborative Google Spreadsheet so that any member of the marketing team could tag their own URLs, whether it was the Marketing Manager for a big keynote announcement, or the Digital Communications Manager for a quick tweet. The sheet has five fields to enter text, including a URL and 4 content parameters. The last column simply concatenates each cell together–with the required character syntax in between–and we were able to quickly iterate tagging different messages for our campaign.

Click to view this free template that is publicly available, where you can copy the formulas and even the whole sheet if you’d like. Enjoy, and have fun splicing and dicing your data!

Google Analytics Campaign tagging Google Spreadsheet

Testing: Twitter Cards for Analytics (and Google Tag Manager)

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Now that I am taking website analytics for granted, my appetite for data is whetted.  I knew of YouTube analytics, so I thought surely Twitter would have some sort of analytics API.

Apparently the way Twitter measures inbound traffic is through Twitter Cards, which are activated every time someone clicks a tweet button and that pop-up-compose-tweet window appears.  As I thought about it, I’d seen this type of information graph before, and it was time to start learning more of these tools and uses of data APIs.

Also, I have implemented Google Tag Manager on this property, so don’t mind me tracking your external link clicks. :]